Bayern stretch Bundesliga lead

first_imgBERLIN (AP):Bayern Munich ground out a 3-1 win at Stuttgart and provisionally opened an eight-point lead to move closer to an unprecedented fourth straight Bundesliga title yesterday.”We need another three wins and a draw to achieve something very special, something no team in Germany ever achieved,” Bayern coach Pep Guardiola said.An own goal from Georg Niedermeier got the defending champions under way in the 31st minute and David Alaba made it 2-0 in the 52nd.Daniel Didavi pulled one back in unorthodox fashion in the 63rd, scooping the ball while on the ground over the helpless Manuel Neuer. Didavi did not have time to get up from his previous attempt.Bayern substitute Douglas Costa sealed it in the 89th with a shot inside the left post.Borussia Dortmund can restore the five-point gap today with a win at Schalke in the Ruhr derby. Five rounds remain after the weekend’s games.”I always watch Bundesliga on Sundays,” Bayern chairman Karl-Heinz Rummenigge said. “But I rely on Bayern Munich and not Borussia Dortmund.”last_img read more

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IOC suggests more Olympic host bidding changes

first_imgThe International Olympic Committee wants to keep considering changes that could result in both the 2024 and 2028 Summer Games awarded in September. An internal letter written by IOC President Thomas Bach’s spokesman suggests further adjustments are needed in the way Olympic hosts are chosen. It references Bach’s statement from last year, saying the “process produces too many losers”. In December, Bach floated the idea of awarding both the 2024 Games, as scheduled, along with the 2028 Games. Los Angeles and Paris are the remaining candidates from a list that began with five cities. Budapest, Hungary, said this week it was withdrawing. The letter, obtained yesterday by the Associated Press (AP), was first reported by Inside The Games. In an interview last week with the AP, Bach said continued speculation about awarding two Olympics at the IOC’s meeting in September “may give us some ideas”. “This procedure as it is … our political environment in such a fragile world just produces too many losers,” Bach said last Saturday. The letter echoed that phrasing, saying “the political situation in our fragile world requires us to further adjust the candidature procedure”. The IOC acknowledged Budapest’s withdrawal, which will be made official by Hungary’s Olympic committee. “It is clear that a promising Olympic Games candidature has been used to promote a broader domestic political agenda beyond the Olympic Games and was overtaken by local politics,” said the letter, written by Bach’s spokesman, Mark Adams. Adams defended Bach’s ‘Agenda 2020’, the core of which was to streamline the Olympics and make bidding more attractive and less expensive for cities. “All three candidates have made it clear that their candidatures would not have taken place without Olympic Agenda 2020,” Adams wrote. Still, the dwindling of the candidate pool raised questions about whether Agenda 2020 was really working. The point of the letter was that Agenda 2020 was only the start and more reforms are needed. If those reforms involve awarding the next two Summer Games this year, it will be a hard sell for both Paris and Los Angeles, each having insisted its proposals are good for only 2024. Replicating plans for 2028 would be possible but would also take significant retooling since many of the contracts in place for development and stadium use are for only the 2024 Olympics. FRAGILE WORLDlast_img read more

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Judge says Jessica’s Law not retroactive

first_imgSACRAMENTO – A federal judge ruled Friday that a voter-approved restriction on where sex offenders can live can’t be applied retroactively, potentially freeing thousands of offenders from a ban on living within 2,000 feet of schools, parks or places where children gather. U.S. District Judge Lawrence Karlton said there was nothing in Proposition 83, commonly known as Jessica’s Law, that specified its provisions were intended to be applied retroactively. When that’s the case, California law requires that the statute apply from the date it takes effect, he added. “The court finds that the law does not apply to individuals who were convicted and who were paroled, given probation or released from incarceration prior to its effective date,” he wrote. Proposition 83 was approved They sought a preliminary injunction to block enforcement of the residency restrictions, but Karlton denied the motion, saying it was unnecessary because the restrictions didn’t apply to the plaintiffs. The attorney for the three plaintiffs, Scott Wippert, said he interpreted the decision as also freeing sex offenders who were released before Proposition 83 was passed from its tracking requirements. “It’s actually a victory for our clients,” he said. “It clarifies the law consistent with what we argued all along, that it’s prospective.” He said the only remaining question was whether the proposition covers sex offenders who were still incarcerated when the measure was approved. “That issue is still up in the air,” he said. Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation spokesman Bill Sessa said the ruling wouldn’t affect residency and monitoring requirements the state imposed on paroled sex offenders before Proposition 83 was approved. Those laws require parolees to live more than 2,000 feet from schools and other areas where children congregate for three years after they’re released, Sessa said. Those sex offenders the state classifies as high-risk also face GPS monitoring, Sessa said. Child molesters also have other restrictions, such as not being allowed to socialize with people who have children or loiter in areas where children gather. “Sex offenders, out of all our parolees, are on the shortest leash and under the biggest microscope of any of them,” Sessa said. “Whatever we do to enforce Jessica’s Law is just an extension of what we do already to regulate these parolees, and, in fact, have been doing since long before passage of the law.” Sessa said that at any one time the state is monitoring some 10,000 paroled sex offenders. Altogether, there are about 90,000 registered sex offenders in California. Attorneys representing the governor, attorney general and local prosecutors disagreed at a hearing on Feb. 5 about whether the proposition should be applied retroactively. Only the attorney general’s office said it should be retroactive, an interpretation Karlton called “frivolous.” Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said he was pleased that the ruling removed a potential impediment to enforcing the statute. “The people of California passed this important initiative to help protect themselves from sexual predators and today’s ruling allows the state to continue its implementation of Jessica’s Law,” he said in a statement. Gareth Lacy, spokesman for Attorney General Jerry Brown, said his office was still interpreting the judge’s order. He said Brown’s goal is to implement the law in a way that protects Californians and gives guidance to law enforcement. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Nov. 7 by 70.5 percent of voters and took effect the next day. As well as barring sex offenders from living within 2,000 feet of places where children gather, the measure increases prison terms for sex offenders and requires lifetime satellite tracking for rapists, child molesters and other felony sex criminals after they are released from prison. The Sacramento case is one of two lawsuits that asked federal judges to interpret the restrictions. A day after the election, U.S. District Judge Susan Illston in San Francisco temporarily blocked the 2,000-foot residency requirement from applying to current registered sex offenders who are not on parole or probation. Karlton’s decision Friday was in response to a lawsuit filed by three unidentified sex offenders, including one on parole and one on probation, who said they lived within 2,000 feet of schools or parks. last_img read more

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