Series tied after Mono Game 2 win

first_imgRay Parks. Photo from ASEAN Basketball LeagueBobby Ray Parks Jr. feels he has figured out San Miguel Beer-Alab Pilipinas’ problems that led to a Game 2 loss to Mono Vampire in the Asean Basketball League Finals.“We weren’t playing our style of play in the first half,” Parks said, after the Thai ball club escaped with a 103-100 win late Wednesday night in Sta. Rosa, Laguna, that tied the series at 1-1.ADVERTISEMENT In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ LATEST STORIES Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew “In the second half, we did a better job, but with a team like that, they’ll take advantage of everything that you do wrong. One turnover, one backdoor play, one missed defensive play, they’ll take advantage of it,” added Parks, who had 21 points, eight rebounds and four assists in the loss.San Miguel-Alab hopes to correct those mistakes in time for Game 3, when the series shifts to Bangkok.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown“I’m definitely excited about that,” Parks said. “All we got to do is rest first and make adjustments. We need to figure out better defensive assignments and really bring it. We’re deep with our bench and everybody plays a part on our team.” Green group flags ‘overkill’ use of plastic banderitas in Manila Sto. Niño feast Jo Koy draws ire for cutting through Cebu City traffic with ‘wang-wang’ ‘Stop romanticizing Pinoy resilience’ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Zark’s-Lyceum trips Che’Lu-SSC, forces D-League Finals decidercenter_img P16.5-M worth of aid provided for Taal Volcano eruption victims — NDRRMC Truck driver killed in Davao del Sur road accident Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Scientists seek rare species survivors amid Australia flames MOST READ Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

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New Orleans’ cooking not about to jump on healthy bandwagon

first_imgOver the years, New Orleans has made a number of lists for the fattest and most out-of-shape residents. In 2005, it was lumped among the top 10 fattest cities in a less-than-scientific survey done by Men’s Fitness magazine. The Louisiana-based WOW Cafe & Wingery, which has restaurants in 17 states, announced this month it is switching to a trans fats-free canola oil. But there are a number of restaurants in the bulk frying business that are reluctant to change. Deanie’s Seafood Restaurant in New Orleans, where the menu includes fried artichoke hearts, fried crawfish tails, fried shrimp and crab claws and fried soft-shell crab, has no plans to change its frying oil, which contains trans fats. But the manager said Deanie’s may make the switch someday. “It’s definitely a trend that we’ll have to be mindful of,” Chandra Chifici said. In Southern states, where fried chicken is a restaurant staple, many chefs said they aren’t concerned about the movement to ban trans fats. “The only real threat is that it might take us back to more authentic Southern cooking again – using butter or some other natural oil to fry and saut ,” said John Currence, chef-owner of City Grocery restaurant in Oxford, Miss., where the menu includes shrimp and grits, prepared with garlic-infused olive oil and bacon fat. At Restaurant Eugene in Atlanta, chef Linton Hopkins does a Sunday menu of traditional Southern foods, including fried chicken cooked in peanut oil flavored with bacon drippings, sliced ham and lard. He said natural fats and oils “just taste better.”160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Prudhomme and others agree a good roux – the flour browned in oil that helps give gumbo and Louisiana sauces their color and flavor – is done with natural oil like peanut oil. “And there’s nothing wrong with dripping a little pork loin in there,” said Prudhomme, who is famously overweight himself. Some cooking oils, shortening and margarine contain artificial trans fats, which give oil a longer shelf life and sustain higher cooking temperatures. But trans fats have come under fire from health advocates for clogging heart arteries. In December, New York City banned artificial trans fats at restaurants. Around the country, Starbucks, KFC, McDonald’s and Burger King say they will phase them out, and Crisco, introduced in 1911 and the first shortening product made entirely of vegetable oil, is getting a new formula that nearly eliminates trans fats. Several states, including Michigan, California and Oregon, are studying a possible ban. But there has been no such talk in Louisiana. NEW ORLEANS – Visitors who come to the Big Easy with a big appetite for its sinfully rich food need not fear: This city of beignets, crab cakes, fried oysters and gumbo is not about to jump onto the trans-fat ban wagon. New Orleans, which regularly ranks among America’s fattest, most out-of-shape cities, is simply not the kind of place to let health concerns interfere with the exquisite pleasures of a meal cooked with butter, bacon drippings, heavy cream and lard. “We take it to the butter-load, baby,” said chef Paul Prudhomme at his world-famous French Quarter restaurant, K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen, where cooks brush melted butter over pans of jalape o bread and saut De plump Gulf of Mexico shrimp in butter and seasonings. In truth, most of New Orleans’ big-name, white-linen restaurants do not even use trans fats for their haute Cajun and Creole cuisine, but only because they prefer the rich flavors of natural oils and fats. last_img read more

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