Double-killing of elderly couple was ‘unspeakable tragedy’, inquest hears

first_imgGraphic content wanting: An inquest into the brutal double-killing of an elderly Donegal couple has heard how they died of severe head trauma.Jimmy and Kathleen Cuddihy, from Carndonagh, died on Wednesday, October 23, 2014, after their son, Julian, killed them. Julian was later found not guilty of murdering them by reason of insanity and is currently being detained in the Central Mental Hospital in Dundrum.Chief State Pathologist Professor Marie Cassidy said the couple both suffered severe head trauma due to ‘chop injuries’ inflicted with an axe.She concluded that Mrs. Cuddihy’s death would have been ‘instantaneous’, however, Mr. Cuddihy showed signs of trying to defend himself, with defensive wounds being discovered on his body.Prof. Cassidy said she attended the scene of the murder at the Cuddihy’s home at Churchtown, Carn, on Thursday, October 24.She said Mr. Cuddihy was found, face up, in a pool of blood in the kitchen, while the body of his wife, Kathleen, was in the hallway.Prof. Cassidy said both had ‘severe and significant injuries’.Julian Cuddihy, 42, arriving at a special sitting in Ballyshannon District CourtA port mortem investigation, which was carried out at Letterkenny General Hospital the following day, revealed that Mr. Cuddihy had a fractured skull.She said he had been struck at least four times with a heavy instrument, adding that they had been inflicted in ‘rapid succession’ while he was more than likely on the ground.Prof. Cassidy said these injuries alone would have been enough to cause his death but in addition to this, he also received six stab wounds, with a smaller instrument, to his face and neck.She said these were ‘shallow wounds’.Mr. Cuddihy also received ‘puncture wounds’ to his right artery. Prof. Cassidy revealed that the retired Carn School teacher was on warfarin, which would have made him bleed more, adding that he also suffered from heart disease.However she said this had no impact on his death as the head injuries he sustained would have been significant enough to kill a younger fit man, who no heart condition.Prof. Cassidy noted that Mr. Cuddihy also had bruising and scraps to his arm, which indicated defensive wounds caused during the attack.The State Pathologist said all of Mr. Cuddihy’s injuries were consistent with injuries caused by an axe, knife and scissors found at the scene.She concluded that cause of dead was severe head trauma as result of chop injuries.Prof. Cassidy also conducted the post mortem of Mrs. Cuddihy on the same day in Letterkenny.She said Mrs. Cuddihy, a retired nurse and charity volunteer, had an instant death. She said Mrs. Cuddihy’s post mortem revealed that she had one severe ‘chop injury’ to the top of her head, which would have knocked her to the ground. She then received six more of these injuries to the left hand side of her head. Like Mr. Cuddihy these were sustained in rapid succession.Prof. Cassidy outlined that Mrs. Cuddihy received no other blows to her body other than these seven blows to the head.She concluded that Mrs. Cuddihy’s death was due to severe head trauma due to the chop injuries she sustained.In both victims, Prof. Cassidy found that the couple died after they had eaten a potato based meal.*********THE deaths of Jimmy and Kathleen Cuddihy will forever be engrained in the minds of the local Gardai who attended the scene and who were involved in the investigation.Garda Inspector David Murphy said Gardaí serving in Inishowen on October 24, 2014, were met with ‘an unimaginable scene’ when they attended the Cuddihy home. He described the local couple’s killing as an ‘unspeakable tragedy’ for the Cuddihy family.Speaking at the conclusion of the inquest into their death, Insp. Murphy said the date of their death will forever be engrained in the family’s mind. However he said it would also be engrained in his mind and the minds of other Gardai involved in the investigation.“This was an unspeakable tragedy for the entire Cuddihy family and I would like to extend my sympathies and condolences to them,” said Insp. Murphy.“This tragedy stunned everyone.”Insp. Murphy paid tribute to the members of an Garda Síochana involved, saying they pursued Julian not knowing what they could meet, as he ‘wasn’t in a proper state of mind’.He also acknowledged Fr. George McLaughlin who attended the scene and provided a service for the family.**********Son killed parents ‘while the balance of his mind was disturbed’INISHOWEN’S coroner ruled that a popular Carn couple were killed by their son, ‘while the balance of his mind was disturbed’.Jimmy and Kathleen Cuddihy were killed at their home in Churchtown, Carndonagh, on October 23, 2014. Their son, Julian, was charged with their murder, however after a criminal trial in Dublin, he was found not guilty by reason of insanity.Speaking at the inquest into Mr. and Mrs. Cuddihy’s death, Dr. John Madden said the usual protocol in these types of cases was that a jury would come in and a verdict of unlawful killing would be found. However as Julian was found not guilty by reason of insanity, Dr. Madden said there was no need for jury and instead he would find an unusual ‘narrative verdict’. He said that both Mr and Mrs. Cuddihy were killed by their son Julian ‘while the balance of his mind was disturbed’.He said the death of the Cuddihys had shocked ‘not just Inishowen but also the whole of Ireland and beyond’.“I cannot understand what was going through Julian’s mind that day,” said Dr. Madden.“But this shocked everyone. I sympathise with the entire Cuddihy family, and I would include Julian in that. He is in hospital now, getting treatment and getting better so I’m sure he must be horrified with what he has done.”Poignantly Dr. Madden said he had known the Cuddihys since he moved to Carndonagh in 1973 and one of their daughters had even babysat his children at a stage. He said Jimmy and his son James had been at his house two weeks before his death fixing a gate.“Everyone knew Jimmy from his sociable outlook and from his teaching at the secondary school,” added Dr. Madden.The coroner and retired GP also worked with Mrs. Cuddihy when she was a nurse.He added that he hoped the conclusion of the inquest brought some closure to the Cuddihy family and allow them to get on with their lives.On behalf of the Cuddihy family, James Cuddihy Jr said he would like to thank Dr. Madden and the Gardaí for the ‘professional manner’ in which they conducted the investigation and inquest.*******The Cuddihys were their ‘normal selves’ before their death – inquest heardTHE last people to see Jimmy and Kathleen Cuddihy before they died told their inquest that they were their normal selves before the tragedy that befell them.Mairead Porter Cuddihy, Jimmy and Kathleen’s daughter in law, said she was working in her and her husband’s building and engineering company behind the Cuddihy family home on Wednesday, October 23, when Kathleen rang her to say the dinner was ready.Mrs Porter Cuddihy said she called down to the house and collected two plates of dinner and brought it back up to the office for her and husband, James Cuddihy Jnr.She said they ate the dinner in the office and about five minutes later they received another phone call from Kathleen to ask if they wanted more potatoes, but they didn’t.Mrs. Porter Cuddihy said it was around 6.20pm when she collected the dinner from the home where she spoke with Mrs. Cuddihy. She noted however that she did not see her father-in-law, Jimmy, in the kitchen at this time.Meanwhile, Mrs. Mary McLaughlin Farren, who worked with Kathleen in the Good as New Shop in Carn, said she saw Jimmy around 5.20pm or 5.30pm.Mrs. McLaughlin Farren said she knew Kathleen since she was a child and they worked together in the Good as New shop in Malin and then Carn. She said Jimmy would normally leave her home to Malin every evening after they closed the shop. On the day of the couple’s death, Jimmy collected her as normal and took her home. She said her and Kathleen were a bit late in closing the shop that evening. She added that Jimmy was his ‘normal self’ and was driving the family car.*********‘I saw my mother laying in the corridor – I fell to the ground and screamed’THE SON and daughter of Jimmy and Kathleen Cuddihy said they ‘knew something was wrong’ when they couldn’t contact their parents, the day they were killed.Delilah Cuddihy told an inquest into their death, that she left her work straight away when she couldn’t contact her father on Thursday, October 24, 2014.She said she arrived at school that morning around 9am when she received a phone call from her sister-in-law to say she couldn’t get a hold of her father, Jimmy. He was supposed to take her to hospital that morning for an appointment.Giving evidence at their inquest in Carndonagh on Thursday, Ms. Cuddihy said it was ‘very unusual’ that her father’s phone was going straight to voicemail when she called him. She said she left school and drove straight to her parent’s house a short distance away.Similarly, her brother James Cuddihy, whose business is situated behind the Cuddihy family home, said he ‘knew something was wrong’ when he tried ringing them but couldn’t get them. He said the back door of the house was always open, but on this occasion it was locked and the blinds were closed.Mr. Cuddihy said he had also went to the Good as New Shop that his mother had been volunteering in but this was also closed.James called Delilah and when she came to the house he helped her to climb in a window, unaware what she was about to see inside. He said all he could here was screaming from inside the house then.“When I got to the house I met my brother James, he said the door was locked,” explained Ms. Cuddihy.“We found an open window and I got him to give me a leg up and I went in through the window. I found my mother laying in the corridor, I fell to the ground and screamed. I panicked and turned, went back into mammy and daddy’s bedroom and climbed out the window. I lay down on the concrete and screamed,” her statement read.Her brother James explained how he then tried to break down the back door but his legs were like jelly so he got one of his employees, Paddy Nelson to break it down instead.“I think I went into the house first,” he told the inquest. “I found my parents bodies, I knew they were dead, there was no need to check for a pulse.”Delilah said her brother came running out of the family home with his hands on his head, she said ‘oh Jesus is dad there?’ but her brother informed her they were both dead.This report originally appeared in this week’s Inishowen Independent newspaper and is reproduced by kind permission.Double-killing of elderly couple was ‘unspeakable tragedy’, inquest hears was last modified: July 27th, 2016 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:axeCarndonaghdonegalInishoweninquestJulian Cuddihylast_img read more

Continue Reading →

ENCODE Study Forces Evolutionists to Retract “Junk DNA” Myth

first_img(Visited 178 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 At least 80% of the human genome is functional, scientists now say, based on a genetic survey called ENCODE that may force reassessment of what a gene is.The big news in human genetics this week is the publication of results by the ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) consortium, “the most ambitious human genetics project to date,” and what it reveals about function in the human genome.  When the human genome was first published, scientists were surprised that only about 3% of it coded for proteins.  That was before they knew about all the coded information in the “epigenome,” which includes RNA transcripts that regulate the code.  The new results show that at least 80% of the human genome is, in fact, functional, rendering the evolutionary notion of “junk DNA” (leftovers from our evolutionary past) incorrect.  Evolutionists themselves are writing the “eulogy for junk DNA.”There is so much buzz about this story that came out in Nature this week, all we can do is list some of the more prominent headlines.  References to Nature are from the 6 September 2012 issue, volume 489, no. 54.  Popular reports in the news media are too numerous to list.Nature’s news feature “ENCODE: The Human Encyclopaedia” by Brendan Maher begins, “First they sequenced it. Now they have surveyed its hinterlands. But no one knows how much more information the human genome holds, or when to stop looking for it.“Evolution is mentioned in some of the Nature papers, but after notions of “evolutionarily conserved” and “evolutionary constraints” are removed (which refer to lack of evolution), what is left is mostly assumption rather than discovery.  In Nature‘s summary article “Genomics: ENCODE Explained,” one mention of evolution was not particularly helpful to Darwinists: “Why evolution would maintain large amounts of ‘useless’ DNA had remained a mystery, and seemed wasteful,” Barroso wrote.  “It turns out, however, that there are good reasons to keep this DNA.”  Then Barroso listed some of the good things the non-coding DNA does.  In the section “Evolution and the Code,” two of the authors stashed most of the understanding in the future: “many aspects of post-transcriptional regulation, which may also drive evolutionary changes, are yet to be fully explored.”  The other three authors did not mention evolution.Nature looked back at a quote by Nobel laureate David Baltimore 11 years ago when the human genome was first published: “Unless the human genome contains a lot of genes that are opaque to our computers, it is clear that we do not gain our undoubted complexity over worms and plants by using many more genes. Understanding what does give us our complexity — our enormous behavioural repertoire, ability to produce conscious action, remarkable physical coordination (shared with other vertebrates), precisely tuned alterations in response to external variations of the environment, learning, memory … need I go on? — remains a challenge for the future.”   Now, Peter Bork and Richard Copley state that the ENCODE data “may offer insight into function and regulation beyond the level of individual genes. The draft is also a starting point for studies of the three-dimensional packing of the genome into a cell’s nucleus. Such packing is likely to influence gene regulation … The human genome lies before us, ready for interpretation.”Nature posted a video by members of the ENCODE team explaining what their published results mean to human genetics.  ENCODE Lead Coordinator Ewan Birney describes the hundreds of terabytes of raw data generated in the 5-year project involving hundreds of people.  “There are probably things that we have no idea what they’re doing and yet they’re doing something important,” he says, hinting at potentially more than 80% function.  “It’s very hard to get over the density of information,” he said.  Genes can no longer be considered discreet sections of code.  The data looks more like a jungle.  There are “places in the genome we thought were silent and they’re teeming with life,” he said.A profile of Ewan Birney was written by Elisabeth Pennisi in the current view of Science (Sept 7, 337:6099, page 1167-1169, doi:10.1126/science.337.6099.1159). Birney is “a self-taught programmer turned bioinformatician” who brought hundreds of people together and worked very hard to bring knowledge of the human genome to this point.“Human Genome Is Much More than Just Genes,” Elizabeth Pennisi wrote for Science  NOW.  The project provided a kind of “Google Maps” for the genome, allowing studies of the epigenome (codes above the genetic code) and regulatory elements that might be implicated in disease.“ENCODE Project Writes Eulogy for Junk DNA” is another article by Elizabeth Pennisi in Science Sept 7, pp. 1159-1161.  Sample quotes by scientists:“I don’t think anyone would have anticipated even close to the amount of sequence that ENCODE has uncovered that looks like it has functional importance,” says John A. Stamatoyannopoulos, an ENCODE researcher at the University of Washington, Seattle.These results are going “to change the way a lot of [genomics] concepts are written about and presented in textbooks,” Stamatoyannopoulos predicts.“It’s a treasure trove of information,” says Manolis Kellis, a computational biologist at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge who analyzed data from the project.“What we found is how beautifully complex the biology really is,” says Jason Lieb, an ENCODE researcher at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.“Regulation is a 3D puzzle that has to be put together,” Gingeras says. “That’s what ENCODE is putting out on the table.”Alongside a beautiful artwork of the DNA double helix, New Scientist echoed the theme that “junk DNA” is obsolete.  “The reams of ‘junk’ DNA that make up the majority of our genetic code appear to have a purpose after all, according to the results of a global research project.”  Switches, for instance, have a purpose: “The switches also appear to be spread out over the genome, with some being located at a distance from the gene they are controlling,” reporter Jessica Hamzelou wrote.  “Around 95 per cent of the genome appears to be very close to a switch, suggesting that almost all of our DNA may be doing something important.“On Science Daily: “Mapping a World Beyond Genes” commented on the epigenome so central to the ENCODE project: “The term ‘epigenome‘ refers to a layer of chemical information on top of the genetic code, which helps determine when and where (and in what types of cells) genes will be active. This layer of information includes a suite of chemical changes that appear across the genetic landscape of every cell, and can differ dramatically between cell types.”“Yale Team Finds Order Amidst the Chaos Within the Human Genome,” announces another article on Science Daily.  After describing the hierarchical information structure of the epigenome, likening it to management levels in a company (but with less “middle management” bottlenecks), this article looked for evidence for evolution in pseudogenes, calling them ” stretches of fossil DNA, evolutionary remnants of an active biological past.”  These pseudogenes, though, are not dead: “However, the Yale team shows many of them are resurrected to produce non-coding RNAs, which scientists now know are crucial to the activation and silencing of protein-coding genes throughout the genome.”  Remarkably, one of the Yale team members said this proves evolution is smartly economical: “This is another example of nature not wasting resources, a story we see repeated time and time again throughout the 3 billion letters of our genome.”Another article on Science Daily seems to dilute the evolutionary claim, though, claiming that ENCODE is a forward-looking project casting off obsolete evolutionary notions: “Fast Forward for Biomedical Research: Massive DNA Encyclopedia Scraps the Junk.”  It includes another quote by Birney: “Our genome is simply alive with switches: millions of places that determine whether a gene is switched on or off.”Science Daily also printed a press release from the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology titled, “Major Advances in Understanding the Regulation and Organization of the Human Genome.”  This article stressed how ENCODE is filling the “knowledge gap” that the notion of “junk DNA” explained away.“Biochemical Functions for Most of Human Genome Identified: New Map Finds Genetic Regulatory Elements Account for 80 Percent of Our DNA” is the title of another article on Science Daily.  This one also mentioned evolution, but only briefly, referring to percentages of genes conserved across mammals.  Some of these “newly evolved regulatory regions,” however, work to “encode regulators that activate other genes.”In a similar vein, another Science Daily article announced, “Millions of DNA Switches That Power Human Genome’s Operating System Are Discovered.”  This article discussed not only the computers the scientists used, but how DNA has its own computer-like operating system.“Human Genome Far More Active Than Thought: GENCODE Consortium Discovers Far More Genes Than Previously Thought” announced another article on Science Daily.  What is GENCODE?  The article explained, “The GENCODE Consortium is part of the ENCODE Project that, today, publishes 30 research papers describing findings from their nearly decade-long effort to describe comprehensively all the active regions of our human genome.”  The GENCODE team is looking for more genes and finding them.  In addition, they found 11,000 “pseudogenes” and found “There is some emerging evidence that many of these genes, too, might have some biological activity.”  This hints that pseudogenes may be elevated from evolutionary junk as more is learned about them.Of interest to philosophers of science is whether the ENCODE results will leave the notion of a “gene” intact.  Another article on Science Daily is headlined, “In Massive Genome Analysis ENCODE Data Suggests ‘Gene’ Redefinition.”  For one thing, the “junk DNA” advocates were wrong: “Far from being padding, many of these RNA messages appeared to be functional.”  Even more important. genes are sometimes not distinct loci: “The additional knowledge that parts of one gene or functional RNA can reside within another were surprising, and suggested a picture of the architecture of our genome that was much more complex than previously thought.”  Functions for the remaining 20% of DNA left undefined by ENCODE may be found in the differential gene expression within body tissues, because “a large percent of non-protein-coding RNAs are localized within cells in a manner consistent with their having functional roles.”  And even though some RNAs are not associated with genes, they are increasingly viewed as something greater: a “giant, complex switchboard, controlling a network of many events in the cell by regulating the processes of replication, transcription and translation.”  With these new realizations, one team member commented, “New definitions of a gene are needed.”According to an article in Science Daily, “The full ENCODE Consortium data sets can be freely accessed through the ENCODE project portal as well as at the University of California at Santa Cruz genome browser, the National Center for Biotechnology Information, and the European Bioinformatics Institute. Topic threads that run through several different papers can be explored via the ENCODE microsite page at Nature.com/encode.”The Wall Street Journal provides a sample of coverage from a media site not devoted to science per se: “‘Junk DNA’ debunked” is the headline.  “The discovery ‘is like a huge set of floodlights being switched on’ to illuminate the darkest reaches of the genetic code, said Ewan Birney of the European Bioinformatics Institute in the U.K., lead analysis coordinator for the Encode results.” Stamatoyannopoulos commented, “We created a dictionary of the genome’s programming language.”  Noting that humans have about 30 times as much ‘junk DNA’ (regulatory elements, actually) as other other species, the WSJ said, “The unexpected level of activity seen in the genomic hinterlands may also help explain what makes us human.”  With 30+ papers on the ENCODE project in print and more coming, “The flood of scientific data is likely to keep researchers busy for a long time.”In contrast to all the above articles celebrating information and function in non-coding DNA, New Scientist posted a hold-out article advocating, “Don’t junk the ‘junk DNA’ just yet.”  Is there still “function” in that vanishing term?  “The ENCODE project has revealed that 80 per cent of our genome does something, but doing something is not the same as doing something useful,” the article points out: “there are still very good reasons for thinking that most of our DNA is far from essential.”  The statement confuses “essential” with “adaptive” and begs the question whether something useful must be essential.   A second hand is useful but not essential or else amputees would never have children.   The short article was not specific and did not refer to evolution.  “ENCODE is an epic project that will undoubtedly lead to many advances, but it is premature to leap to grand conclusions,” the article warned.  “Just as the much anticipated human genome project revealed more than a decade ago, ENCODE tells us we still have an enormous amount to learn from the book of life.”Intelligent Design advocates are, meanwhile, gloating over the demise of “junk DNA” and pointing to the exceptional complexity ENCODE has revealed.  Casey Luskin at Evolution News & Views whipped out “Junk No More: ENCODE Project Nature Paper Finds ‘Biochemical Functions for 80% of the Genome’” on the day of Nature‘s announcement.  Robert Crowther reminded readers of Evolution News & Views that “Jonathan Wells Got It Right In The Myth of Junk DNA,” published by the Discovery Institute.  “In 2010 in The Myth of Junk DNA, biologist Jonathan Wells exposed the false claim that ‘junk DNA’ provides decisive evidence for Darwin’s theory,” he said.  “Now he has been vindicated by the leading scientific publications in the world.”Evolutionists are desperately struggling to hang onto their theory in the floodlights revealing layers of complexity far beyond anything Darwin could have conceived.  Blobs of protoplasm, ha!  How about operating systems, switchboards, and hierarchical management structures?  It’s over, Darwinists.  You messed up on vestigial organs, the fossil record and now junk DNA.  Please step aside and let the science of the information age take care of what the evidence demands.last_img read more

Continue Reading →

NESEA Conference Highlights

first_imgBuildingEnergy, the annual conference sponsored by the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association (NESEA), recently concluded in Boston. As usual, the NESEA conference was a great way to catch up with friends and to soak up information offered by some of the smartest scientists, engineers, designers, and builders in the country.Here are notes from some of the presentations. Net-zero isn’t enough The first session I attended was a panel discussion focusing on the embodied energy, environmental effects, and human health effects of building materials.Jack Armstrong, chemical engineer: “It’s not enough to be net-zero-energy or even net-positive. Every product has a lot of components. These materials all have embodied energy and ingredient concerns — for example, flame retardants in foams. With LEED Version 4, we are starting to ask, ‘What about the materials? What about off-gassing?’”Bruce King, structural engineer and straw-bale expert: “If you finish a building this year, the entire carbon hit from the construction happens immediately, beginning on the first day it is occupied. There is no operating energy yet. It takes 15 years for the rising operating energy line to cross the descending line from annual energy hit from the embodied energy of construction. When it comes to addressing climate change, though, now is when we need to make a difference. When you add a lot of solar panels and extra insulation to a project, you are adding a lot of embodied energy up front.”Greg Norris from the International Living Future Institute: “The real impacts of a building are larger than those we usually consider. What’s true for embodied energy is also true for eutrophication, biodiversity, child labor, and human rights abuses. So we all have these multi-dimensional footprints. You cannot drive your footprint to zero. … Net… This article is only available to GBA Prime Members Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details.center_img Start Free Trial Already a member? Log inlast_img read more

Continue Reading →