Sports need good governance

first_imgAs sportS fans around the world reel from revelation after revelation that there is a legitimacy crisis in sports governance, news last week that the 2016 Rhodes Scholar award went to a 24-year-old woman from Clarendon named Sherona Forrester was welcome relief.This young lady from Clarendon epitomises all the attributes recommended by the Rhodes committee.Forrester has been shown to be not only an economics genius, but her life story to date has revealed that it is possible to combine academic work, sports, and community involvement without sacrificing any personality traits.Forrester has represented this nation at football and singing, as well as being involved (at leadership level) in countless other activities that makes a youngster’s life worthwhile.grow where plantedI listened in awe to an interview with her on a local radio station last week and wished that her story could be printed and distributed to all schools under the purview of the Ministry of Education as it shows that you can grow where you are planted.Our 2016 Rhodes Scholar grew up in a rural community and went to school in her vicinity.After earning a place at Glenmuir High, Forrester spent her secondary school life there, and achieved excellence in every sphere of curricular and extra-curricular activity on offer at the school.As her sporting prowess was revealed, history will show that she did not have to go to a brand-name ‘netball school’, or a brand-name ‘maths school’, or a brand-name ‘female football school’ to achieve mastery in her many crafts.Her story must have been a dagger to the hearts of all the proponents of school transfers to enhance the potential of child athletes. You can grow where you are planted.Congratulations to Ms Forrester and the Ministry of Education “Keep up the pressure!”The transfer of students primarily to enhance a school’s sporting record is wrong, and perpetrators need to be exposed and sanctioned.I have been made aware of a report from the Danish Institute of Sports Studies, authored by one Dr Arnout Geeraert, where he looked at (and ranked) sporting federations around the world based on how transparent, democratic, and accountable they were. He has found that the international sports governance system is deeply flawed.By design, international sporting organisations do not allow stakeholders to monitor and sanction decision-making members. None of the associations studied published per diem payments and bonuses given to senior officials. None has term limits for their president.In Jamaica, when you think of (and remember) the fisticuffs, subterfuge, slandering of opponents’ character, and other nefarious activities that surround the elections for presidents of our sporting associations – a non-paying job – and the point-blank refusal to step down in the face of genuine concern and criticism of fans, the impression is that we need to do something about our own problems. Something is indeed rotten, and it is not only in the state of Denmark!IMPATIENT FOR ANSWERSThe war of words between the president of the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB) andthe chairman of a Caricom Committee chaired by the prime minister of Grenada is impatient of a solution.Readers may recall that a committee set up to look at the governance structure of West Indies cricket, with majority members nominated by the WICB, found that the president and his executive body should immediately be dissolved and an interim body set up to administer cricket in the West Indies.The president, Dave Cameron and his executive, after agreeing to abide by the findings of the committee, is now using every ploy known to man to extend the life of their board. Interesting times are indeed ahead. I hope that when the smoke clears, the will of the people of the Caribbean will prevail.We need term limits, annual salaries, and published audited accounts for all of our sporting organisations. Nothing else will do.last_img read more

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Court action filed to compel President, Cabinet to resign

first_imgFormer Attorney General (AG) Anil Nandlall has approached the court to compel the David Granger-led coalition Cabinet to stop meeting and resign.The proceedings were filed on Monday. However, a date is yet to be fixed for hearing of the Fixed Date Application.In the court documents seen by Guyana Times, Nandlall is asking for an order compelling the Cabinet, including the President, to resign consequent of the Government being defeated by the vote of a no-confidence on December 21, 2018— which is in accordance with Article 106 (6) of the Guyana Constitution. He is also seeking a Mandatory Order compelling the Cabinet, including the President, to give effect to the resignation of the Cabinet, including the President, which occurred by operation of law following the successful passage of the No-Confidence Motion (NCM).The former AG is also seeking a Conservatory Order, or an order restraining the Cabinet, inclusive of the President, from meeting, making decisions, or performing the functions of Cabinet, consequent of the successful passage of the motion as outlined in the Constitution.Article 106 (6) states: “The Cabinet including the President shall resign if the Government is defeated by a vote of majority of all the elected members of the National Assembly”.In his affidavit, Nandlall posited that as a politician and elected representative of Guyanese, he has a public, parliamentary, political and constitutional duty to ensure that the laws of Guyana are obeyed and complied with, especially by the Executive.“I file these proceedings in the discharge of those duties and am clothed with the requisite locus standi to do so,” the Opposition Member of Parliament stated.Nandlall pointed out that provisions of Article 106 (6) clearly mandates and compels the Cabinet, inclusive of the President, to resign once it is defeated by a vote of no-confidence.However, nine months after the passage of the motion, Cabinet has failed and neglected to resign in accordance with the unambiguous prescription and mandate of Constitution, and continues to function in contravention of Article 106 (6).He noted that in January 2019, multiple legal challenges were launched against the validity, legality and constitutionality of the said No-Confidence Motion, and despite the courts— including the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ)— ruling that “upon the passage of this motion of no confidence in the Government, the clear provisions of Article 106 immediately became engaged” as well as a recent letter from Opposition Leader Bharrat Jagdeo, who requested the President and his Cabinet to resign and dissolve Parliament, the Head of State did not accede to the request.“It must be emphasised that the Leader of the Opposition did not request the President to resign from the Office of the President but to simply resign as a Member and the Chairman of Cabinet. Since then, numerous Members of the Government, inclusive of the Attorney General (Basil Williams), have publicly stated that the Cabinet, inclusive of the President, will not resign, thereby continuing to perpetuate a breach of Article 106(6) of the Constitution,” he outlinedTo this end, Nandlall reminded the Court that it is the guardian of the Constitution, and has an inherent duty to grant appropriate remedies whenever the Constitution is likely to be, is being or has been contravened.The People’s Progressive Party Opposition, of which Nandlall is an Executive Member, has been contending that Guyana is in a constitutional crisis as the government continues to delay the hosting of early elections which was triggered by the passage of the NCM.According to Article 106 (7), “Notwithstanding its defeat, the Government shall remain in office and shall hold an election within three months, or such longer period as the National Assembly shall by resolution supported by not less than two-thirds of the votes of all the elected members of the National Assembly determine, and shall resign after the President takes the oath of office following the election”.This meant elections were to be held since March 21, 2019. However, with the legal challenges, that timeline was on pause but was subsequently reinstated after the July 18, 2019 CCJ ruling, which validated the passage of the motion.Against this backdrop, the Opposition was pushing for a September 18, 2019 polling day. But President Granger had insisted that he cannot set a date without first being advised by the Guyana Elections Commission (GECOM) on its preparedness to host General and Regional Elections.GECOM had come under heavy criticism for deliberately delaying the elections by going ahead with the controversial House-to-House Registration. The constitutionality of this exercise was then challenged in court.In fact, Chief Justice Roxane George earlier this month ruled that the conduct of House-to-House is not unconstitutional or illegal. However, she noted that GECOM cannot operate as it would in a normal elections cycle. Given that the NCM triggered early elections, the Chief Justice had stated that there are other methods that can be used to sanitise the voters’ list in a timely manner, such as Claims and Objections.She had also ruled that it would be unconstitutional for GECOM to remove qualified persons already on the voters’ list. The Opposition had said this was a signification victory since the House-to-House exercise was aimed at creating a new National Register of Registrants (NRR) Database.Nevertheless, the Justice Claudette Singh-led Elections Commission on Tuesday announced that the registration exercise would be scrapped at the end of this month, and the information gathered thus far will be merged with the existing databaseIt was noted that GECOM would then move to an extensive Claims and Objections exercise before a Preliminary List of Electors (PLE) is extracted.President David Grangerlast_img read more

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83-year old Arcadia woman flies plane solo for first tme

first_imgBefore dating Roan, Williams had never ridden in a small plane, much less had any experience flying one. “When I first came here, I didn’t know what they were talking about,” Williams said. “It was like a foreign language.” The couple met through a mutual friend at an Arcadia Senior Center dance about a year ago. Williams approached Roan and asked him to take her on a flight. Williams began taking flying lessons one to three times a week, and the couple take trips on Saturdays. “I go flying and he goes ballroom dancing with me,” Williams said. EL MONTE – Mary Williams got a new perspective on the world a couple months after her 83rd birthday. The Arcadia resident and pilot flew solo for the first time in her life on Wednesday, soaring about 3,000 feet above ground in a Cessna 152 two-seater plane for about 30 minutes for three takeoffs and landings. “The view was so nice,” Williams said in an interview the next day. “I never, ever thought I would be flying a plane.” Williams began taking lessons in August at El Monte Airport, encouraged by her boyfriend, Temple City resident Lee Roan, 77, a longtime recreational pilot. He wanted to make sure she could land the plane if he ever “conked out,” he explained. “Once a week,” Lee was quick to add. The first question on Saturday mornings is about where to go for breakfast. With their aviation buddies, the couple have flown to Chino, Riverside, Lancaster and Apple Valley. It’s about 30 minutes by air to Catalina Island and about 40 minutes to Big Bear. While flying in a two-seater plane may be stomach churning to some, Williams said she feels at ease when she flies. “I feel more safe in a plane than in a car,” Williams said. “If you understand the plane, there’s no fear.” Flying solo for the first time is a milestone achievement for any student, said Darlene Kellogg, Williams’ instructor at Universal Air Academy in El Monte. “You never forget your first solo,” Kellogg said. Williams logged about 70 hours of instruction before she took off on her own. “I just talked myself through it,” Williams said. Operating a plane involves procedures that come easily enough with practice, Williams said. On the dashboard is an assortment of switches and throttles, as well as a bevy of instruments monitoring air speed, attitude, bank and pitch and vertical speed, among other things. “She’s more full of life than people half her age,” said Kellogg. “She’s such a pleasure to fly with. She’s very sharp, she’s very smart, and she really loves to fly.” Plane rental costs about $70 an hour, and instruction about $30 an hour. Williams has a student’s license, which means she has passed a medical exam – her eyesight is perfect – and needs an instructor’s endorsement to fly. She also must undergo flight review every two years. Williams studied physical education at USC and was the first in her family to attend college. She raised three children and was a high school teacher and counselor for 39 years with the Los Angeles Unified School District. After retiring at age 60, Williams stayed busy with hobbies including line-dancing, sailing and golf. “I’ve always been active,” she said. “I think if you are active, you stay young at heart.” patricia.ho@sgvn.com (626) 578-6300, Ext. 4586 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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