Sammy slams ‘short of brains’ comment

first_imgKOLKATA, India (CMC): Captain Darren Sammy has lashed out at cricket broadcaster Mark Nicholas for describing West Indies as “short of brains” in a pre-tournament preview, and says the comment helped served as a catalyst for the side’s success in the ongoing Twenty20 World Cup. Writing before the tournament, Nicholas said West Indies were “short of brains, but have Indian Premier League history in their ranks”, a comment Sammy and the Caribbean side took great exception to. “How could you describe people with ‘no brains’? Animals got brains. We’re not an object,” an emotional Sammy told a media conference on the eve of the Twenty20 World Cup final here yesterday. “To me, that particular comment really set it off for us. You could see me talking about it. It’s kind of emotional, as for somebody who I respect and had good rapport with that particular gentleman. “To describe our team, who were defending champions four years ago, as we guys with no brains is really out of order.” West Indies lost just once in the preliminaries – to Afghanistan in their final game – to top Group 1 ahead of the semi-finals. They then produced a spectacular performance against tournament favourites India, chasing down 193 at the Wankhede Stadium on Thursday in Mumbai to book their spot in the final. Sammy said that because of the criticism, West Indies had become closer as a unit and were now highly motivated ahead of today’s final. “Everybody is entitled to his opinion. You guys (media) ask most difficult questions to get a good story. We understand that. The key for us is the belief in our own circle. Whatever they say, it does not really matter,” Sammy pointed out. “God doesn’t love the ugly, and we’re very wonderful and very beautiful men. That’s why we play exciting cricket. For us, all these things have happened before the tournament. That’s the passion, determination that we take on the field. It’s one more step. We believe that we could do it.” Highly motivatedlast_img read more

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So much gas is escaping from this distant galaxy it could form

first_img By Sid PerkinsSep. 6, 2018 , 2:00 PM Growing pains aren’t just for awkward teens: Thanks to a chance alignment of galaxies, astronomers have detected a massive loss of gas from an ancient galaxy that’s dramatically slowing the rate of stars forming there, a finding that sheds light on star formation in the early universe.The distant group of stars, known as SPT2319-55, is more than 12 billion light-years away from Earth—which means researchers are observing the galaxy as it was when the universe was only 1 billion years old. Objects that far away are typically too faint to observe in detail, but the gravitational effects of a massive galaxy between that star group and Earth bends SPT2319-55’s light like a lens, which both focuses the light and intensifies its features.When astronomers looked at the wavelengths at which hydroxyl molecules in the galaxy absorbed light, they noted a big shift—which, in turn, reveals that immense clumps of gas and dust are being flung from the galaxy at speeds of up to 800 kilometers per second (artist’s representation, above). That outflow is propelled by pressure waves created by the explosions of large numbers of dying stars. Altogether, that material would be enough to create more than 500 stars the size of our sun each year, the researchers report online today in Science. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country So much gas is escaping from this distant galaxy, it could form 500 stars a year D. Berry/NSF/AUI/NRAO Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Because the estimated escape velocity from SPT2319-55 is about 650 kilometers per second, some of that gas and dust—about 10% of it, the researchers estimate—will be forever lost to intergalactic space. But the rest of it will eventually fall back into the galaxy, fueling new waves of star growth there for tens of millions of years. Emaillast_img read more

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