Arsenal must keep fighting, says Kolasinac

first_img0Shares0000Arsenal left back Sead Kolasinac celebrates a goal in a past Premier League match PHOTO/Daily MailLONDON, United Kingdom, Mar 8- Arsenal defender Sead Kolasinac has urged his teammates to pick themselves up and do their utmost to perform against Milan on Thursday.The Gunners head into the UEFA Europa League last-16 clash with the Rossoneri on the back of four consecutive defeats, which included back-to-back losses against Manchester City and most recently a 2-1 defeat against Brighton. Kolasinac admits it is tough to recover from those disappointments but believes it’s up to the players to take on the challenge in Italy.“It is a difficult situation for us,” he told DAZN. “We did not play well in the two games against Manchester City.“In some situations, we did not play bad. But honestly, we have to say that Manchester City have a phenomenal team, especially in their attack. Sometimes you have to admit that they are better or are in a better situation.“They are first in the league with a huge gap to second. Naturally, they are playing different. But the atmosphere in our team has to be good and it is good as well, because we cannot bury our heads in the sand right now.“On Thursday, we fly to Milan. We cannot bury our heads in the sand. We have to look forward and try to do better next time.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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TRIAL BEGINS OF MAN CHARGED WITH LETTERKENNY SEX ASSAULT

first_imgThe trial has started of a man charged with sexually assaulting a woman in Letterkenny.Letterkenny District Court.The man is charged with sexually assaulting the woman on May 17th, 2010. The man pleaded not guilty to the charge when he appeared at Letterkenny Circuit Court.The woman is expected to give her evidence by video-link from Australia where she now lives.TRIAL BEGINS OF MAN CHARGED WITH LETTERKENNY SEX ASSAULT was last modified: February 4th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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ENCODE Study Forces Evolutionists to Retract “Junk DNA” Myth

first_img(Visited 178 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 At least 80% of the human genome is functional, scientists now say, based on a genetic survey called ENCODE that may force reassessment of what a gene is.The big news in human genetics this week is the publication of results by the ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) consortium, “the most ambitious human genetics project to date,” and what it reveals about function in the human genome.  When the human genome was first published, scientists were surprised that only about 3% of it coded for proteins.  That was before they knew about all the coded information in the “epigenome,” which includes RNA transcripts that regulate the code.  The new results show that at least 80% of the human genome is, in fact, functional, rendering the evolutionary notion of “junk DNA” (leftovers from our evolutionary past) incorrect.  Evolutionists themselves are writing the “eulogy for junk DNA.”There is so much buzz about this story that came out in Nature this week, all we can do is list some of the more prominent headlines.  References to Nature are from the 6 September 2012 issue, volume 489, no. 54.  Popular reports in the news media are too numerous to list.Nature’s news feature “ENCODE: The Human Encyclopaedia” by Brendan Maher begins, “First they sequenced it. Now they have surveyed its hinterlands. But no one knows how much more information the human genome holds, or when to stop looking for it.“Evolution is mentioned in some of the Nature papers, but after notions of “evolutionarily conserved” and “evolutionary constraints” are removed (which refer to lack of evolution), what is left is mostly assumption rather than discovery.  In Nature‘s summary article “Genomics: ENCODE Explained,” one mention of evolution was not particularly helpful to Darwinists: “Why evolution would maintain large amounts of ‘useless’ DNA had remained a mystery, and seemed wasteful,” Barroso wrote.  “It turns out, however, that there are good reasons to keep this DNA.”  Then Barroso listed some of the good things the non-coding DNA does.  In the section “Evolution and the Code,” two of the authors stashed most of the understanding in the future: “many aspects of post-transcriptional regulation, which may also drive evolutionary changes, are yet to be fully explored.”  The other three authors did not mention evolution.Nature looked back at a quote by Nobel laureate David Baltimore 11 years ago when the human genome was first published: “Unless the human genome contains a lot of genes that are opaque to our computers, it is clear that we do not gain our undoubted complexity over worms and plants by using many more genes. Understanding what does give us our complexity — our enormous behavioural repertoire, ability to produce conscious action, remarkable physical coordination (shared with other vertebrates), precisely tuned alterations in response to external variations of the environment, learning, memory … need I go on? — remains a challenge for the future.”   Now, Peter Bork and Richard Copley state that the ENCODE data “may offer insight into function and regulation beyond the level of individual genes. The draft is also a starting point for studies of the three-dimensional packing of the genome into a cell’s nucleus. Such packing is likely to influence gene regulation … The human genome lies before us, ready for interpretation.”Nature posted a video by members of the ENCODE team explaining what their published results mean to human genetics.  ENCODE Lead Coordinator Ewan Birney describes the hundreds of terabytes of raw data generated in the 5-year project involving hundreds of people.  “There are probably things that we have no idea what they’re doing and yet they’re doing something important,” he says, hinting at potentially more than 80% function.  “It’s very hard to get over the density of information,” he said.  Genes can no longer be considered discreet sections of code.  The data looks more like a jungle.  There are “places in the genome we thought were silent and they’re teeming with life,” he said.A profile of Ewan Birney was written by Elisabeth Pennisi in the current view of Science (Sept 7, 337:6099, page 1167-1169, doi:10.1126/science.337.6099.1159). Birney is “a self-taught programmer turned bioinformatician” who brought hundreds of people together and worked very hard to bring knowledge of the human genome to this point.“Human Genome Is Much More than Just Genes,” Elizabeth Pennisi wrote for Science  NOW.  The project provided a kind of “Google Maps” for the genome, allowing studies of the epigenome (codes above the genetic code) and regulatory elements that might be implicated in disease.“ENCODE Project Writes Eulogy for Junk DNA” is another article by Elizabeth Pennisi in Science Sept 7, pp. 1159-1161.  Sample quotes by scientists:“I don’t think anyone would have anticipated even close to the amount of sequence that ENCODE has uncovered that looks like it has functional importance,” says John A. Stamatoyannopoulos, an ENCODE researcher at the University of Washington, Seattle.These results are going “to change the way a lot of [genomics] concepts are written about and presented in textbooks,” Stamatoyannopoulos predicts.“It’s a treasure trove of information,” says Manolis Kellis, a computational biologist at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge who analyzed data from the project.“What we found is how beautifully complex the biology really is,” says Jason Lieb, an ENCODE researcher at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.“Regulation is a 3D puzzle that has to be put together,” Gingeras says. “That’s what ENCODE is putting out on the table.”Alongside a beautiful artwork of the DNA double helix, New Scientist echoed the theme that “junk DNA” is obsolete.  “The reams of ‘junk’ DNA that make up the majority of our genetic code appear to have a purpose after all, according to the results of a global research project.”  Switches, for instance, have a purpose: “The switches also appear to be spread out over the genome, with some being located at a distance from the gene they are controlling,” reporter Jessica Hamzelou wrote.  “Around 95 per cent of the genome appears to be very close to a switch, suggesting that almost all of our DNA may be doing something important.“On Science Daily: “Mapping a World Beyond Genes” commented on the epigenome so central to the ENCODE project: “The term ‘epigenome‘ refers to a layer of chemical information on top of the genetic code, which helps determine when and where (and in what types of cells) genes will be active. This layer of information includes a suite of chemical changes that appear across the genetic landscape of every cell, and can differ dramatically between cell types.”“Yale Team Finds Order Amidst the Chaos Within the Human Genome,” announces another article on Science Daily.  After describing the hierarchical information structure of the epigenome, likening it to management levels in a company (but with less “middle management” bottlenecks), this article looked for evidence for evolution in pseudogenes, calling them ” stretches of fossil DNA, evolutionary remnants of an active biological past.”  These pseudogenes, though, are not dead: “However, the Yale team shows many of them are resurrected to produce non-coding RNAs, which scientists now know are crucial to the activation and silencing of protein-coding genes throughout the genome.”  Remarkably, one of the Yale team members said this proves evolution is smartly economical: “This is another example of nature not wasting resources, a story we see repeated time and time again throughout the 3 billion letters of our genome.”Another article on Science Daily seems to dilute the evolutionary claim, though, claiming that ENCODE is a forward-looking project casting off obsolete evolutionary notions: “Fast Forward for Biomedical Research: Massive DNA Encyclopedia Scraps the Junk.”  It includes another quote by Birney: “Our genome is simply alive with switches: millions of places that determine whether a gene is switched on or off.”Science Daily also printed a press release from the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology titled, “Major Advances in Understanding the Regulation and Organization of the Human Genome.”  This article stressed how ENCODE is filling the “knowledge gap” that the notion of “junk DNA” explained away.“Biochemical Functions for Most of Human Genome Identified: New Map Finds Genetic Regulatory Elements Account for 80 Percent of Our DNA” is the title of another article on Science Daily.  This one also mentioned evolution, but only briefly, referring to percentages of genes conserved across mammals.  Some of these “newly evolved regulatory regions,” however, work to “encode regulators that activate other genes.”In a similar vein, another Science Daily article announced, “Millions of DNA Switches That Power Human Genome’s Operating System Are Discovered.”  This article discussed not only the computers the scientists used, but how DNA has its own computer-like operating system.“Human Genome Far More Active Than Thought: GENCODE Consortium Discovers Far More Genes Than Previously Thought” announced another article on Science Daily.  What is GENCODE?  The article explained, “The GENCODE Consortium is part of the ENCODE Project that, today, publishes 30 research papers describing findings from their nearly decade-long effort to describe comprehensively all the active regions of our human genome.”  The GENCODE team is looking for more genes and finding them.  In addition, they found 11,000 “pseudogenes” and found “There is some emerging evidence that many of these genes, too, might have some biological activity.”  This hints that pseudogenes may be elevated from evolutionary junk as more is learned about them.Of interest to philosophers of science is whether the ENCODE results will leave the notion of a “gene” intact.  Another article on Science Daily is headlined, “In Massive Genome Analysis ENCODE Data Suggests ‘Gene’ Redefinition.”  For one thing, the “junk DNA” advocates were wrong: “Far from being padding, many of these RNA messages appeared to be functional.”  Even more important. genes are sometimes not distinct loci: “The additional knowledge that parts of one gene or functional RNA can reside within another were surprising, and suggested a picture of the architecture of our genome that was much more complex than previously thought.”  Functions for the remaining 20% of DNA left undefined by ENCODE may be found in the differential gene expression within body tissues, because “a large percent of non-protein-coding RNAs are localized within cells in a manner consistent with their having functional roles.”  And even though some RNAs are not associated with genes, they are increasingly viewed as something greater: a “giant, complex switchboard, controlling a network of many events in the cell by regulating the processes of replication, transcription and translation.”  With these new realizations, one team member commented, “New definitions of a gene are needed.”According to an article in Science Daily, “The full ENCODE Consortium data sets can be freely accessed through the ENCODE project portal as well as at the University of California at Santa Cruz genome browser, the National Center for Biotechnology Information, and the European Bioinformatics Institute. Topic threads that run through several different papers can be explored via the ENCODE microsite page at Nature.com/encode.”The Wall Street Journal provides a sample of coverage from a media site not devoted to science per se: “‘Junk DNA’ debunked” is the headline.  “The discovery ‘is like a huge set of floodlights being switched on’ to illuminate the darkest reaches of the genetic code, said Ewan Birney of the European Bioinformatics Institute in the U.K., lead analysis coordinator for the Encode results.” Stamatoyannopoulos commented, “We created a dictionary of the genome’s programming language.”  Noting that humans have about 30 times as much ‘junk DNA’ (regulatory elements, actually) as other other species, the WSJ said, “The unexpected level of activity seen in the genomic hinterlands may also help explain what makes us human.”  With 30+ papers on the ENCODE project in print and more coming, “The flood of scientific data is likely to keep researchers busy for a long time.”In contrast to all the above articles celebrating information and function in non-coding DNA, New Scientist posted a hold-out article advocating, “Don’t junk the ‘junk DNA’ just yet.”  Is there still “function” in that vanishing term?  “The ENCODE project has revealed that 80 per cent of our genome does something, but doing something is not the same as doing something useful,” the article points out: “there are still very good reasons for thinking that most of our DNA is far from essential.”  The statement confuses “essential” with “adaptive” and begs the question whether something useful must be essential.   A second hand is useful but not essential or else amputees would never have children.   The short article was not specific and did not refer to evolution.  “ENCODE is an epic project that will undoubtedly lead to many advances, but it is premature to leap to grand conclusions,” the article warned.  “Just as the much anticipated human genome project revealed more than a decade ago, ENCODE tells us we still have an enormous amount to learn from the book of life.”Intelligent Design advocates are, meanwhile, gloating over the demise of “junk DNA” and pointing to the exceptional complexity ENCODE has revealed.  Casey Luskin at Evolution News & Views whipped out “Junk No More: ENCODE Project Nature Paper Finds ‘Biochemical Functions for 80% of the Genome’” on the day of Nature‘s announcement.  Robert Crowther reminded readers of Evolution News & Views that “Jonathan Wells Got It Right In The Myth of Junk DNA,” published by the Discovery Institute.  “In 2010 in The Myth of Junk DNA, biologist Jonathan Wells exposed the false claim that ‘junk DNA’ provides decisive evidence for Darwin’s theory,” he said.  “Now he has been vindicated by the leading scientific publications in the world.”Evolutionists are desperately struggling to hang onto their theory in the floodlights revealing layers of complexity far beyond anything Darwin could have conceived.  Blobs of protoplasm, ha!  How about operating systems, switchboards, and hierarchical management structures?  It’s over, Darwinists.  You messed up on vestigial organs, the fossil record and now junk DNA.  Please step aside and let the science of the information age take care of what the evidence demands.last_img read more

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Dairy Margin Coverage payments top $300 million as signups

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Dairy Margin Coverage (DMC) program signed up more than 22,000 dairy farmers  —more than participated in the last year of the Margin Protection Program (MPP) that it replaced — and paid out more than $302 million in its first year. That’s $302 million more than what farmers would have received under the MPP, which would have actually cost farmers money in 2019, according to an analysis of USDA data done by NMPF.Monthly milk price/feed cost margins so far in 2019 have been above the $8 per hundredweight coverage cutoff that existed under MPP, but below the new $9.50 per hundredweight coverage limit under DMC, the stronger dairy safety net enacted last year in the farm bill. Under the old MPP rules, the total paid out under the entire program so far this year would have been $75,000 — about $3 per farmer and a net loss for them after premium costs. Instead, the new DMC threshold has triggered hundreds of millions of dollars in much-needed assistance for dairy producers, showing the program’s value and helping farmers stay afloat who otherwise may not have been able to continue.With 2020 signup beginning on Oct. 7, that success is worth keeping in mind as farmers weigh the program’s affordable cost versus its proven benefits.“The Dairy Margin Coverage program has proven its worth, with more than $300 million in farmers’ pockets as a result of our work on the farm bill with Congress and USDA,” said Jim Mulhern, president and CEO of the National Milk Producers Federation. “None of that assistance would have occurred under the MPP. We encourage farmers who haven’t already signed up for all five years of Dairy Margin Coverage to re-new their sign up for 2020, and for farmers who decided not to participate in the 2019 program to consider it in the future.”According to the latest USDA data, 22,631 dairy producers signed up for DMC. Based on reported margins for the first eight months of the year, payouts so far for 2019 have been $302,906,824. Wisconsin signed up the largest number of farmers, while California enrolled the highest production volume of any state.A key change to the program that boosted aid was the inclusion of dairy-quality alfalfa into the feed-cost calculation, which narrowed the difference between milk prices and feed costs and adjusted margins to better reflect dairy expenses, a change that NMPF pushed for throughout legislation and implementation.“We thank USDA not only for prioritizing the DMC in farm-bill implementation but adjusting it in a way that provided additional benefit to producers,” Mulhern said. “The DMC’s success has truly been a partnership throughout, from a united dairy community that aided Congress as it crafted and approved the program, to USDA’s work with that community in making it reality.”last_img read more

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8 Surprising Startup Lessons: What You Don’t Know You Don’t Know

first_imgHow to Meet the Demands of the Socially Conscio… It takes more than a big idea and a thorough business plan to start a new business. Most entrepreneurs aren’t quite sure what else it takes until they’re well underway, and many are shocked to discover important elements of startup success that they simply hadn’t considered at all.To find out what startups learn they really need but never though of, we asked eight successful young entrepreneurs from the Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC) for their input. The results may surprise you as much as it did these startup founders: 1. AdaptabilityDuring the early days of our startup, we were bringing on people with very specific experiences and skill sets who had previously worked at larger organizations that were more structured and reliable. We soon realized that a better fit for us was to hire employees who were highly adaptable and open to – and able to – constantly change their roles and responsibilities depending on the needs of the business. The people who thrived and really made a significant impact to the success of our startup were those who could evolve and roll with the punches. They were comfortable with the relative lack of stability that you typically experience at a startup as it begins to ramp up. – Ben Rubenstein, Yodle 2. The Ability To Say “No”Many startups focus intensely on growth—sometimes to a fault. When I dove into real estate, I found myself exploring and experimenting with every possible revenue-generating activity. At the time I thought I was being thorough and productive, but I was really straining our company’s resources and physically draining myself. While it’s extremely important to experiment, every company should have a clearly identified core focus and mission. This helps you analyze opportunities that arise along the way and decline those that aren’t best aligned with your goals. It took me a while to realize it, but saying “no” is equally as important as green-lighting certain initiatives. The most productive, and ironically, sustainably innovative businesses I know are also very good at saying “no.” —Kent Healy, The Uncommon Life 3. LogisticsAfter raising our angel round of funding, my company decided to greatly increase our marketing and advertising spend. We sponsored 11 conferences throughout the year in major cities across the US. I tried to organize everything myself, but scheduling flights, hotels, car rentals and sponsorship passes was an absolute nightmare for me. Luckily, the account manager on my team was very organized and loved logistics. He took the lead and turned my nightmare into a happy dream. I focused on closing client deals while our new logistics and operations manager took care of all of the logistics. —Jun Loayza, Tour Woo 4. ImplementationThere’s no shortage of great ideas and vision in the excitement of a startup, but without implementation, it falls flat! Having a team in place and members who excel at follow-through and implementation is key to taking the vision and putting it into action. Most entrepreneurs are quick starters and big dreamers, so details become tedious and bothersome. If you’re not strong at follow-through, partner with a business manager or create automated systems that ensure things get done! —Kelly Azeved, She’s Got Systems 5. Avoiding Growth For Growth’s SakeWhen my partner Lev and I grew InsuranceAgents.com to #24 on the Inc. 500, we did it by growing for growth’s sake, not smart growth. Any revenue-generating opportunity we came across, we automatically said, “Yes!” The end result was a massive collapse of the company in 2009. However, through sheer effort and tons of luck, we managed to save it at the last second. Lesson learned: never grow for growth’s sake. It’s critical to slow down, take a deep breath, and ask yourself if your company can honestly support the strain that comes along with that new revenue stream. —Seth Kravitz, Technori 6. Time ManagementI know, it sounds boring. But as an entrepreneur, you are naturally dealing with limited resources, and you need to maximize your productivity. Specifically, you need to prioritize your activities so you are focusing your time, money and energy on activities that will bring you closer to your goals. If you don’t have a system for managing your time effectively, youíre squandering your most precious resource. If you want some great productivity tips, check out the book, No B.S. Time Management for Entrepreneurs by Dan Kennedy. —Pete Kennedy, Main Street ROI 7. Sales Is For EveryoneWhen starting a business, it is quite easy to put different hats on your team—“I will be sales, you lead our tech, she’ll be marketing and he’ll be in charge of operations and administration.” The reality of startup life is that everyone needs to build skills in selling the idea. This does not mean that each employee should treat every person they meet as an opportunity for a cash transaction. However, when you are involved in a startup, every person you meet might be of value, whether as a customer, adviser, partner or simply a brand advocate. Knowing your idea and being able to discuss it clearly and passionately will help the business uncover critical resources from everywhere. Every team member’s informal development plan should include a goal of improving communication and sales. —Aaron Schwartz, Modify Watches 8. Don’t Ignore Your HealthThis might sound silly, but hydration is super important to keep my mind strong while in startup mode. We are all attached to our desks, cranking away on computers, and in business meetings. When do we have time to drink water? I’m serious—sometimes our health is ignored in our business, but in fact it enables our personal and business health. Stay hydrated! —Erica Dhawan, Erica Dhawan Inc. and GalahadsThe Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC) is an invite-only nonprofit organization comprised of the world’s most promising young entrepreneurs. The YEC recently published #FixYoungAmerica: How to Rebuild Our Economy and Put Young Americans Back to Work (for Good), a book of 30+ proven solutions to help end youth unemployment. Tags:#start#startups How to Cultivate the Skill of Being a Creative … Related Posts center_img AI Will Empower Leaders, Not Replace Them How Connected Communities Can Bolster Your Busi… scott gerberlast_img read more

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FIFA World Cup 2014: Netherlands vs Brazil, 3rd place Play-off

first_imgDaley Blind celebrates after scoring the opening goal for Netherlands Robin van Persie and Daley Blind scored early goals to help give the Netherlands a 3-0 win over host Brazil in the third-place match at the World Cup on Saturday.Fans React | Match Photos With the result, the Netherlands finishes a World Cup unbeaten in regular play for the first time, having lost to Argentina on penalties in the semifinals. After finishing runner-up in 2010, the third place is the best position for the Dutch squad since it lost the final in 1974 and 1978.The loss added to Brazil’s frustration at the home tournament following the disastrous 7-1 defeat to Germany. After the final whistle, the team was loudly booed by the nearly 70,000 fans that attended the match at the National Stadium in Brasilia. Many had already left even before the late third goal by the Dutch.Team Lineups(from):Brazil: Julio Cesar; Maicon, Thiago Silva, David Luiz, Maxwell; Paulinho (Hernanes, 57th), Luiz Gustavo (Fernandinho, 46th), Ramires (Hulk, 73rd), Oscar, Willian; Jo.Netherlands: Jasper Cillessen (Michel Vorm, 90th, injury time); Stefan De Vrij, Ron Vlaar, Bruno Martins Indi, Daley Blind (Daryl Janmaat, 70th); Georginio Wijnaldum, Jonathan De Guzman, Jordy Clasie (Joel Veltman, 90th); Dirk Kuyt, Robin Van Persie, Arjen Robbenlast_img read more

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