Sharpeyed robins can see magnetic fields

first_img More information: Magnetoreception of Directional Information in Birds Requires Nondegraded Vision, Katrin Stapput et al., Current Biology, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2010.05.070 (PhysOrg.com) — It has been known for decades that some birds are able to sense the Earth’s magnetic field and set their direction as if following a compass heading, which is an extremely useful ability for birds migrating long distances. The ability is believed to be linked to the availability of light and it is thought that specialized molecules in the birds’ retinas allow them to literally see the magnetic fields, which appear as patterns of light and shade superimposed over the regular image from light. Now a new study shows that the internal compass also depends on the birds having clear vision in their right eyes. Explore further A Robin Wearing Goggles Researchers led by Katrin Stapput of Goethe-Universitat in Frankfurt, Germany, studied the vision of the European robin to try to learn more about how the magnetic sensing might work. They found that if the right eye was covered by a frosted goggle, the birds could not navigate effectively, while they could navigate perfectly well if the left eye was covered instead.Numerous studies have been carried out on the ability of birds to sense magnetic fields since the phenomenon was first discovered in 1968 in the European robin. These studies had already revealed that the sense depends on light and that it involves the right eye and the left side of the brain, but the details were still unclear.The most likely molecules involved in the sensing of magnetic fields are thought to be cryptochrome and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), which are found in the light-sensitive cells in the retina. When struck by blue light, cryptochrome and FAD both shift into an active state in which each molecule has an unpaired electron, creating a “radical pair.” The presence of magnetic fields affects the time it takes for the radical pair molecules to revert to their inactive state.Cryptochrome also affects the light sensitivity of retinal cells, which suggests it may also affect sensitivity to magnetic fields. In effect, the magnetic fields create light or dark shadings over what the bird usually sees, and the shadings change as the bird turns its head, giving it a visual compass from the patterns of shading.Stapput decided to test the theories by fitting robins with goggles that were covered with clear foil on one side and frosted foil on the other. Both sides of the goggles were equally translucent, allowing 70 percent of the light to get through, but on the frosted side the image was less clear. The birds were then kept in cages until it was time for them to migrate.The birds were released into a funnel-shaped cage with its walls painted with correction fluid, which was scratched if the birds touched them. The results were that birds with no eye coverings, and birds with the left eye covered set off in a northerly direction as expected, while those with the right eye covered were disoriented and headed in random directions.Stapput’s experiment is the first to show that magnetic sensing does not just depend on light being present as previously thought, but that the bird must have a sharp, focused image in its right eye. The magnetic sensing is overlaid over the normal vision, and if that is distorted, Stapput said the patterns of light and dark would make little sense since the bird cannot separate the information from the visual and magnetic images. The visual and magnetic images both involve variations in light and shade, but visual images tend to have sharp lines and edges, while the magnetic images have more gradual changes from light to dark.The experiments lend support to the radical pair hypothesis but do not rule out another explanation. Chickens also orientate themselves by the Earth’s magnetic field This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Sharp-eyed robins can see magnetic fields (2010, July 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-07-sharp-eyed-robins-magnetic-fields.html © 2010 PhysOrg.comlast_img read more

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Quantum dot LEDs get brighter more efficient

first_img Explore further Journal information: Chemistry of Materials Red, green, and blue QLEDs, with the applied voltages in the upper left corner. The green QLED has a luminance of 168,000 candelas per square meter, which is more than three times higher than the previous best QLED brightness. Image credit: Jeonghun Kwak, et al. ©2012 American Chemical Society In areas besides brightness, the QLEDs have also improved but still lag behind OLEDs. The new QLEDs’ efficiencies (7.3%, 5.8%, and 1.7% for red, green, and blue devices, respectively) improve over previous QLEDs, although OLEDs can have efficiencies of up to 20%. Another challenge for both QLEDs (and OLEDs to a lesser extent) is lifetime. Since the early research of the ’90s, QLED lifetimes have not improved past a few tens of hours, and they experience rapid deterioration within a few hours of operation. QLEDs with inverted structures, like those used here, can have half-lifetimes of up to 600 hours, compared with tens of thousands for OLEDs.Although QLEDs don’t match the performance of OLEDs, the engineers explain that QLEDs have a few potential advantages that make them worth investigating further.“The luminous efficiency of the best OLEDs (phosphorescent OLEDs) and inorganic LEDs are comparable, up to ~100 lm/W for white emission,” Changhee Lee said. “However, the efficiency of QLEDs is still way behind, about 10 times lower. The efficiency of red and green QLEDs reported in our paper is comparable to the efficiency of the best ‘fluorescent’ OLEDs, which use fluorescent organic dyes as emitters. Of course, the lifetime of QLEDs is much lower than OLEDs and inorganic LEDs at this time. The potential advantages of QLEDs are: (1) much narrower emission bandwidth (full width at half maximum ~30 nm compared with 60-80 nm of OLEDs), which means that QLEDs have more saturated and purer color than OLEDs; (2) easier tunability of emission colors in the entire visible range by simply controlling the particle size and shape with the same chemical composition for the QD; (3) and therefore the cost of emitters are much lower for QLEDs while organic phosphorescent emitters used for best OLEDs are very expensive.”Overall, the brightness, efficiency, lifetime, and low turn-on voltage of the new QLEDs suggest that the quantum dot devices could have promising applications as TV, computer, and phone displays as well as lighting devices. Since quantum dots can be printed as ink, these displays and devices could also benefit from low-cost production methods.“Our future plan is to further improve the efficiency and reliability of QLEDs, in particular, blue QLEDs,” Changhee Lee said. “In parallel, we will make a full-color active matrix QLED display using our improved RGB QLED technology. We will also work on developing Cd-free QLEDs because of environmental and safety concerns related with Cd. We recently reported InP QLEDs in Chemistry of Materials, but their efficiency is very low. Therefore, we will work on developing new precursors for InP QDs and improving the performance of Cd-free OLEDs.” (Phys.org) — While quantum dot-based light-emitting diodes (QLEDs) are not made of organic materials, they share many of the same advantages as organic LEDs (OLEDs). For instance, both QLEDs and OLEDs outshine semiconductor-based LEDs in terms of their greater flexibility, better color quality, and potential for lower cost since they can be fabricated using a simple process on a large-area substrate. But ever since the first QLEDs were demonstrated in the mid-’90s, about a decade after OLEDs, their performance has lagged behind OLEDs despite ongoing improvements. Now in a new study, a team of researchers from South Korea has designed and demonstrated QLEDs with an improved efficiency and unprecedented brightness that matches the brightness of today’s best fluorescent OLEDs. Citation: Quantum dot LEDs get brighter, more efficient (2012, April 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-04-quantum-dot-brighter-efficient.html More information: Jeonghun Kwak, et al. “Bright and Efficient Full-Color Colloidal Quantum Dot Light-Emitting Diodes Using an Inverted Device Structure.” Nano Letters. DOI: 10.1021/nl3003254center_img Copyright 2012 Phys.Org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. The research teams at Seoul National University, South Korea, led by Changhee Lee, Kookheon Char, and Seonghoon Lee, have published their study in a recent issue of Nano Letters.As the researchers explain in their study, the key to improving the brightness and efficiency of the QLEDs is improving the injection of current-carrying electrons and holes into the quantum dots. The more efficiently the electrodes can inject electrons and holes into the quantum dots, the more efficiently the device can emit light. Usually, the anode is made of indium tin oxide, whose transparency allows light to escape. But here, the researchers inverted the device by making the indium tin oxide the cathode with the help of zinc oxide nanoparticles as an electron transport layer, which performed charge carrier injection much more efficiently than before.“The most important cause of the low performance of QLEDs is the poor injection of holes into the quantum dots (QDs) from the anode and neighboring hole transport layer due to a huge potential energy barrier,” Changhee Lee told Phys.org. “Because of that, the electron-hole balance is not achieved, resulting in low quantum efficiency and low maximum brightness. Furthermore, the excess electrons or holes, which do not recombine in the QD layer and enter the neighboring organic hole-transport or electron-transport layers (HTL or ETL), can cause leakage current and device degradation, resulting in poor efficiency and stability. Therefore, good carrier injection is a key factor for realizing high-performance QLEDs.”By patterning different sized quantum dots on the layer of zinc oxide nanoparticles, the engineers could fabricate QLEDs of three different colors: red, green, and blue. Whereas previous QLED brightness levels were in the range of 10,000 candelas (cd) per m2, the new red QLED displayed a brightness of 23,000 cd/m2 and the green achieved a remarkable 218,000 cd/m2 – the highest ever for a QLED and comparable to the best OLEDs. The previous highest QLED brightness is 68,000 cd/m2, which was for a green QLED reported last year by Lei Qian, et al. The new blue QLED displayed a lower brightness of 2,000 cd/m2, but low blue performance has been one of the biggest disadvantages of both QLEDs and OLEDs. Quantum-dot LED screens may soon rival OLEDs and LCDs , Nano Letters This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Fireflies give Korean team bright idea for LED lighting

first_img © 2012 Phys.org Nanowires offer opportunities for improved LEDs PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen (Phys.org)—Scientists are doing it all the time, attempting to mimic systems and structures of plants and animals to manufacture something entirely new. A group of South Korean scientists have collaborated to translate what they observed in fireflies over toward a better, less expensive, LED lens. Their work is essentially mimicking a bioluminescent organ for lighting applications Following the contemporary practice of investigating biological systems, the team attempted to copy the structure of a firefly’s underbelly into work that may lead to more efficient and cheaper LED lighting. They wrote about a better anti-reflective lens for light-emitting diodes (LED) in their paper, “Biologically inspired LED lens from cuticular nanostructures of firefly,” which was recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences More information: Biologically inspired LED lens from cuticular nanostructures of firefly lantern, PNAS, Published online before print October 29, 2012, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1213331109AbstractCuticular nanostructures found in insects effectively manage light for light polarization, structural color, or optical index matching within an ultrathin natural scale. These nanostructures are mainly dedicated to manage incoming light and recently inspired many imaging and display applications. A bioluminescent organ, such as a firefly lantern, helps to out-couple light from the body in a highly efficient fashion for delivering strong optical signals in sexual communication. However, the cuticular nanostructures, except the light-producing reactions, have not been well investigated for physical principles and engineering biomimetics. Here we report a unique observation of high-transmission nanostructures on a firefly lantern and its biological inspiration for highly efficient LED illumination. Both numerical and experimental results clearly reveal high transmission through the nanostructures inspired from the lantern cuticle. The nanostructures on an LED lens surface were fabricated by using a large-area nanotemplating and reconfigurable nanomolding with heat-induced shear thinning. The biologically inspired LED lens, distinct from a smooth surface lens, substantially increases light transmission over visible ranges, comparable to conventional antireflection coating. This biological inspiration can offer new opportunities for increasing the light extraction efficiency of high-power LED packages. A bioluminescent organ such as a firefly lantern uses its bioluminescence to attract a mate. They studied how the lantern layers work to allow for light, paying attention to the firefly lantern’s intricate structure. They used a scanning electron microscope and numerical analysis. Further spectroscopic experiments revealed the highly ordered structure reduces optical impedance between air and the cuticle, acting as an anti-reflective layer that cuts the loss of light and raises efficiency. In turn, they created an artificial version for use as a high-power LED lens. center_img Play Demonstration of the biologically inspired LED lens. There are five different LED lenses on an LED chip. Credit: (c) PNAS “The nanostructures on an LED lens surface were fabricated by using a large-area nanotemplating and reconfigurable nanomolding with heat-induced shear thinning. The biologically inspired LED lens, distinct from a smooth surface lens, substantially increases light transmission over visible ranges, comparable to conventional antireflection coating. This biological inspiration can offer new opportunities for increasing the light extraction efficiency of high-power LED packages,” they wrote. They noted that the conventional anti-reflection coating of existing LED lights is an expensive process. They said that conventional polymer lenses for LEDs are made by injection molding and then adding an antireflective coating with sputtering. Their method differed. They found that they could produce an anti-reflective plastic lens with just a single-step injection molding process. They said doing so meant driving down the cost of efficient LEDs. Their LED lens was made using a polyurethane-based optical resin.The authors of the study are from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Firefly Institute, Korea Basic Science Institute, and Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science. Explore further Citation: Fireflies give Korean team bright idea for LED lighting (2012, November 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-11-fireflies-korean-team-bright-idea.html Contact angles of PDMS prepolymer on (A) fluorocarbon and (B) glass surfaces. Credit: (c) PNAS, Kim et al. 10.1073/pnas.1213331109 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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How not to Excel Austerity economics paper is codingflawed

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org) —Required reading for those examining the cause and effect of bread lines: Two papers, one published in 2010 and the other published just this month, poking holes into the 2010 study and inciting a global wave of publicity. The 2010 paper, by Harvard economists Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff, “Growth in a Time of Debt.” claimed that as countries see debt/GDP going above 90 percent, growth slows dramatically: High levels of national debt lead to low or negative economic growth. The paper was supported by those involved in policy debates from the U.S, to Europe, calling for austerity measures as a panacea to balance budgets and ease high levels of national debt, turning back a perceived tide of continued negative economic growth. Study finds national debt ‘tipping point’ that slows economic growth Citation: How not to Excel: Austerity economics paper is coding-flawed (2013, April 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-04-excel-austerity-economics-paper-coding-flawed.html Explore furthercenter_img © 2013 Phys.org This month, however, University of Massachusetts academics said the 2010 study had errors. The real headline-maker by those viewing the new study turned out to be that, among the weaknesses found, was a coding error in Excel.The new report is a turning point in long-standing controversy over the 2010 paper, as other economists sought to replicate the results drawn in the two authors’ presentation, yet they were unable to do so. The authors of the new paper, “Does High Public Debt Consistently Stifle Economic Growth? A Critique of Reinhart and Rogoff,” by Thomas Herndon, Michael Ash, and Robert Pollin, figured out why other scholars had such a difficult time replicating the results. Examining the data spreadsheet used in the 2010 study, the University of Massachusetts authors discovered several flaws.The Excel error was not the primary problem but part of a number of weaknesses, according to the three authors. In addition to the Excel spreadsheet errors, they said they identified excluded data, and what they said were unusual weightings of statistics from which the two authors’ conclusions were drawn. The abstract of the newly published paper said, “Herndon, Ash and Pollin replicate Reinhart and Rogoff and find that coding errors, selective exclusion of available data, and unconventional weighting of summary statistics lead to serious errors that inaccurately represent the relationship between public debt and GDP growth among 20 advanced economies in the post-war period.”In addition, the authors wrote that, “Overall, the evidence we review contradicts Reinhart and Rogoff’s claim to have identified an important stylized fact, that public debt loads greater than 90 percent of GDP consistently reduce GDP growth.”At the same time, one of the co-authors, Ash, told Businessweek that the new paper, in examining the 2010 study, did indicate a modest diminishment in growth in countries suffering large debts but not like the stagnation or decline in the study by the Harvard authors.In response, according to the Financial Times, Rogoff and Reinhart acknowledged the Excel spreadsheet mistake: “Herndon, Ash and Pollin accurately point out the coding error that omits several countries from the averages in figure 2. Full stop. HAP are on point,” they said. At the same time, they defended their basic research conclusion regarding higher debt leading to slower growth. More information: www.nextnewdeal.net/rortybomb/ … are-serious-problemslast_img read more

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Caterpillar chemical turns ants into bodyguards

first_img More information: Current Biology, DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2015.07.016 Citation: Caterpillar chemical turns ants into bodyguards (2015, August 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-08-caterpillar-chemical-ants-bodyguards.html © 2015 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Butterflies deceive ants using chemical strategies Scientists have studied Japanese oakblue butterflies before, noting that ants seem to guard the young caterpillars, but until now that relationship was described as reciprocal, both seemed to derive some benefit. The caterpillars got protection and the ants got a nice meal. Now however, according to this new research, the ants may not be willing partners.In studying the caterpillars in their natural environment, the researchers noted that the ants did not just eat the free meal and leave, instead, they stayed with the caterpillar—that got them to wondering if there was more to the relationship than has been thought.To find out, they brought several specimens of both creatures back to their lab for testing. Some of the ants were allowed to feed on the caterpillar secretions, while others were not. The ants that ate the secretions stayed with the caterpillar, while those that did not, wandered away. Even more surprising, the researchers found that whenever the caterpillar raised its tentacles, flipping them—the ants became aggressive, actively seeking out enemies, trying to make them go away. The researchers believe flipping its tentacles is a defensive move by the caterpillars. Ants that did not eat the secretions did not attack in response to tentacle actions. The researchers also dissected the ants and found that those that ate the secretions had lower levels of dopamine in their brains, which is usually associated with degree of aggression in organisms. They then gave the ants that had eaten the secretions from the caterpillar a drug called reserpine—it blocks the transport of dopamine. That caused the ants to ignore tentacle flipping and to abandon the caterpillar.The ingredients in the caterpillar secretions have not yet been identified, but the researchers believe it likely contains chemicals that impact dopamine levels in ant brains, causing them to stay with the caterpillar and to protect it when danger arrives.center_img Journal information: Current Biology Arhopala japonica. Credit: Wikipedia Explore further A trio of researchers with Kobe University in Japan has found that lycaenid butterfly caterpillars of the Japanese oakblue variety, have dorsal nectary organ secretions that cause ants that eat the material to abandon their fellow ants to instead hang out with and defend the caterpillar against enemies. In their paper published in the journal Current Biology, Masaru Hojo, Naomi Pierce and Kazuki Tsuji describe their research into the relationship between the two creatures and why they believe the nature of that relationship needs to be reclassified.last_img read more

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Boost your creativity by developing your distant thinking skills

first_imgThe common human default mode is that we focus our energy on the here-and-now, and care less about ourselves and the events of the farther-off future. The creative mind may tell us still more about how we connect to our future selves. Read the whole story: Quartz Researchers that include UCLA Anderson’s Hal E. Hershfield have established that prompting individuals to think about their own distant future reduces acts of present-bias. Young adults shown a photographic rendering of their retirement-age self committed to saving more today for retirement. Individuals prompted to think about themselves 20 years on chose to exercise more often. It also prompted participants in one study to make more ethical choices.center_img This present-bias can get in the way of all sorts of decisions that might improve our lot. The struggle with delayed gratification is what makes it hard to choose saving for retirement over spending today, or committing to a diet or exercise plan for our future health at the cost of spending less time on the couch binging Netflix and a pint of Ben & Jerry’s. Or, say, supporting public policy aimed at tamping down the march of global warming for the benefit of future generations. An inability to think far into the future has also been shown to influence our empathy and ability to consider the perspective of our enemies.last_img read more

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When postman called to say hello

first_imgJashne bachpan, organised by Sanskaar Rang Toli of National School of Drama was inaugurated by eminent actor Dr Mohan Agashe. Held at Abhimanch auditorium, National School of Drama campus, the inauguration was followed by a performance of Dakghar by Bodhir Bidya Bhawan, Kolkata.The participating groups at Jashnebachpan 2012 are from different regions of the country and will perform in various Indian languages at Abhimanch, Sammukh and Shri Ram Centre. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The plays will be performed in Hindi, Bangla, Assamese, Kannada, Marathi, Malayalam, Nepali, Manipuri, Tamil and English and most of the plays will have sub titles.Scheduled from November 18 to 28, the focus of the festival is performances by special children. Three plays will be performed by special children including Dakghar as the opening performance and Dastaan-E-Dilli by Arth-Aastha, Delhi as the closing performance besides Buddhuram by Seagul Theatre, Guwahati. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThis 11 day theatre festival will showcase 17 plays and will see performances directed by Dadi D Pudumjee, Feisal Alkazi and Radhika Alkazi, Swatilekha Sengupta, KG Krishnamurthy, Bhagirathi, Susanta Mondal, Kiran Bhat and Dr Sripad Bhat, N Jadumani Singh, Jaimini Pathak, Mandya Ramesh, Anurupa Roy, Krishna Bhuyan, Saggherr Loadhii, Kannan, Manish Saini, Rajiv Krishnan, Bijon Mondal.In addition to this an interaction session is scheduled to take place from 19 to 29 November daily from 10.30 am onwards with the directors, group leaders and members so that the participant groups of Jashnebachpan interact to absorb energies, skills and processes in order to gain inspiration for their future work.Apart from Jashnebachpan, Saanskar Rang Toli organises Bal Sangam, a festival of Indian performing folk and traditional arts presented by children practising these arts from different regions of the country every alternate year.last_img read more

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A Turkish delight

first_imgGet ready for a cultural fest where Turkish art, music, dance and food will come together to create a heady culture-cocktail. The New Delhi Turkish Fest will be open to the general public free of charge from 5-10 PM on Friday, 22 March and from 11am to 10 pm on 23 March and 24 at Select City Walk, Saket. The festival is being inaugurated by HE Dr. Burak  Akcapar (Turkish Ambassador in India).Visitors will get an opportunity to celebrate, learn and savor Turkish hospitality, culture, heritage and cuisine. Organized by the Indialogue Foundation, this year the festival will showcase the miniatures of some of Turkey’s greatest monuments such as the Hagia Sophia, Blue Mosque, Rumi’s Tomb, Capadocia, etc. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The festival will have performances by the Whirling Dervishes of Rumi, Live Turkish music and folk dance performances, Ney performances, (Ney is a rim-blown, oblique flute made of reed and has six finger-holes in front and a thumb-hole in back. Using cross-fingering, finger-hole shading, and embouchure adjustment). Besides these there are also performances by Mehteran, the Ottoman Military Band thought to be the oldest variety military marching band in the world. There will also be calligraphy demonstrations where you can get your messages engraved on cards, key rings, plates and tablets and an Oriental Corner where you can pick some decorative Turkish pillows, tables traditional jewelry, handicrafts, rugs and more.And don’t miss the chance to sample authentic gourmet Turkish pleasures.DETAILAt: Select Citywalk, SaketWhen: 22 – 24 MarchTimings: 5 pm onwardslast_img read more

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Exhibhiting a new beginning

first_imgThe summer is beating down long and hard on the capital of India. Majority of people run off to the mountains to escape summers by taking holidays or gather in evenings and arrange fun things to do.Artz Fine Arts gallery will soon be giving the art lovers in Delhi something to look forward to in this sweltering weather. The gallery brings their unique concepts together in an exhibition titled  Tabula Rasa. The term Tabula Rasa is a term from Latin vocabulary. The term meaning ‘clean slate’ or effectively a ‘new beginning’.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’This exhibition is one of the first of its kinds to happen and  will kick off in September with a preview taking place this month. The exhibition has been well  planned to promote the upcoming talents in visual arts.Tabula Rasa will showcase ten shows in ten weeks’ time; every week will have seven different artistes from all over the nation and from across the globe. Regarding the show, the gallery director Manoj Sejwal said, ‘This gallery is entirely a new venture for me, being a Delhi guy and based in Lado Sarai I have always observed different galleries promoting artists and their talents, but somewhere I felt a bleak about those who never got a chance to be a part of it.’  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix‘My idea of this gallery and this show is to promote and do art for arts’ sake’.‘All ten shows will have curated approaches regarding their display and montage,’ says curator Debabrota Das. Moreover the market is not about branded works, it’s all about good works just like this show.’ he added.The first show of Tabula Rasa is planned in July and the participating artistes in this show are Gazal Alagh, Meena Laisaram, Ritu Singh, Ritu Gupta, Shiv Kiran, Kamal Nath, Shagun Mohindra,Tanushree Singh and Sheetal Gulati. The show will exhibit a variety of art forms such as mediums like paintings, sculptures and photography.To give it a formal start, the gallery has arranged for a wine and cheese evening on 19 July.  The evening will witness  eminent TV actor Ashok Pandey, artists Asit Kumar Patnaik and Jagganath Panda who will open the show. So mark your calenders and head over!last_img read more

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Vietnam 14 dead after scaffolding collapses

first_imgPolice say at least 14 people were killed and 28 others were injured when scaffolding collapsed at a construction site in central Vietnam.Deputy police chief in Ha Tinh province, Bui Dinh Quang, said on Thursday that all the victims were Vietnamese subcontractors hired to work on a seaport breakwater project led by Samsung C&T Corp, a unit of Samsung Corp of South Korea. Quang says it is not known if any more workers are trapped in the rubble. Police and rescue workers are searching through the rubble trying to find any survivors from the yesterday night accident. The Son Duong seaport is part of the Vung Ang economic zone where Taiwan’s Formosa Corp. is building a multi-billion dollar steel complex.last_img read more

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